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Amy’s Blog

Amy Gluck

(Photo credit: © Copyright Tom Demerly)

AMY’S BLOG: 8/11/17

So many good things happened to me this week, it makes it difficult to decide what to write about. In particular, I received my new Argon 18 E-119 Tri+ bike (built by Hometown Bicycles), AND I successfully completed a 12-mile run for my ½ marathon training!

As I mentioned in my blog a few weeks ago, I need to run an 11:14 pace to achieve my goal of running the ½ marathon in 2:26. For my 12-mile run, I managed a solid 11:24 pace (much improved from my 12:35 pace for my earlier 10-mile long run), so I am VERY close to my goal pace. I was able to do this by altering my walk/run intervals: for my 10-mile run, I ran 0.75 mile and walked 0.25 mile; for my 12-mile run, I bumped it up to a 1.8 mile run, followed by a 0.20 mile walk. Not sure how I will adjust this to cut another 0:10 off my pace, but so glad to know I’m well on my way!

I started my 12-mile run at Kent Lake Beach in Island Lake – ran up the hill, under the freeway, across to Kensington, looped around Kensington, and headed back to Island Lake. Once in Island Lake, I took the section of paved path down to Grand River and back to the path’s intersection. I was even able to reach a 6:50 pace over 10 miles into my run! Woo-hoo! By the time I reached my car, I was only at 11.2, so I passed my car and kept going to make it a full 12!

Getting running back has been my biggest struggle following my accident. It’s so frustrating watching my pace crash when I check my results after races. I’m doing EVERYTHING I can to recuperate my running: I use the Alter-G treadmill once a week, practice short runs in sprint distance triathlons, and I am training for a ½ marathon. Additionally, I go to Tri-Covery weekly to keep my muscles in proper tension, and soak in Epsom salt baths every few days.

I’m putting all my faith in these actions to get my running back, but sometimes I wonder if it’s really worth it. Do I really need to come back to Ironman racing, or was surviving this accident good enough?

But it’s all I knew before my accident. It’s all I did. What keeps me motivated is that Ironman training is where all my friends came from. It’s what we did every day! When I struggle, I realize that many of my friends have quit, even though they never went through everything that I went through. When people ask me why I put myself through this, it’s hard to explain the feeling of cruising through your own power – biking, or running – and crossing that finish line and saying, “Yeah, I just DID THAT!” (Especially in Kona, where the Ironman World Championships are located!)

Don’t want to forget my other big news – my new triathlon bike! Riding the Argon 18 is like a dream, very smooth and very light. Of course, riding a new bike is kind of like driving a new car, where you don’t know where the headlights are located, etc. But 36 miles in, I am now getting the hang of it! In my recent triathlons, I haven’t been able to decide between riding my old triathlon bike or my road bike. Now… easy answer! I am beyond excited to put my Argon 18 through its paces, and am SURE it will be my fastest bike split by far! Let’s see how it goes!

Amy is a 5 time Kona qualifier who has done 9 Ironman races, has been named All American by USAT 5 times, and is a Certified Ironman Coach.  She has done countless triathlons and won several of them, including sprint distance races and half Ironman races. Amy is currently conquering unique challenges on her journey back to IRONMAN following a life-altering accident.

Amy Gluck at Northville's Road Runner Classic

AMY’S BLOG: 8/3/17

On race day, I decided to run the Northville Road Runners Classic. It’s a fun run race on the trails at Maybury State Park with a phenomenal after party. You get to choose between the 5K and the 8K. I chose the 8K because I know it’s easier for slower runners to place better in the 8K.

The 8K was intimidating to me because it’s 5 miles, and I’m not able to run 5 straight miles yet without walking. Oh well, if I need to walk, walk, I told myself. DURING A RACE! This would have never happened in the past. If I couldn’t completely run a distance, I would not have selected it. I did anyway.

When I ran this race in 2014, right after my accident, I won a trophy for taking first in my age group! My first trophy since my accident!

So, the gun went off, and so did I, starting my Garmin and trotting along. I felt fine in the beginning. It was a nice, sunny, warm day with clouds just starting to cover the sky and cool it off a little. At the start, we were on paved path, but this was a trail run, so I knew I’d be on the trails shortly. I was excited to run trails again – I hoped the dirt footing would be gentler on my fake body parts. I’d worn my trail shoes, which are designed for the softer impact.

I followed the course along the paved path, which continued… and continued… and continued. We didn’t hit trail until 2.5 miles in. Half of the course, which I’d expected to be trails, was paved, and boy had I chosen the wrong shoes! The pavement was doing more harm to my recovering leg than my trail shoes ever helped me with my footing.

As I limped along, I was grateful for the water stations, where I grabbed water and walked while I drank it. I don’t typically grab water at water stations, and I almost never walk while drinking mid-race. In this instance, I had to throw out all my old rules, and just go with the easiest route possible.

At the end of the race, there was the usual fantastic after party. Pizza, beer, and all of the fresh baked junk food you could dream of. We hung out in the beautiful weather, enjoying the pizza and beer and “maybe” a few brownies, waiting for the awards ceremony. As the award ceremony started, I learned that I took 3rd in my age group! Woo-hoo! I received an award and was excited for my placing.

I finished in 51:52 at a 10:40 pace, which I can’t really be too upset with, since I walked during the race. Next time, I’ll do my course research. Follow me along as I try to improve my run endurance, so that I’ll be able to run 5 – and eventually 13.1 – comfortable miles, instead of just suffering through it!

Amy is a 5 time Kona qualifier who has done 9 Ironman races, has been named All American by USAT 5 times, and is a Certified Ironman Coach.  She has done countless triathlons and won several of them, including sprint distance races and half Ironman races. Amy is currently conquering unique challenges on her journey back to IRONMAN following a life-altering accident.

Amy Gluck at the Pterodactyl Triathlon in the Island Lake T-Rex Series

AMY’S BLOG: 7/27/17

My second “A” race happened on July 19th – the Pterodactyl Tri. My goal was to be faster in each section from my first “A” race, the June 21st Triceratops triathlon. Here’s how things went:

I started the swim, knowing from pool practice that my splits are faster when I swim relaxed than when I push myself hard. So, I kept my swim fairly relaxed. I noticed, as we rounded the 3rd buoy on my way back in, that I was swimming beside my friend who is much faster than me. That was a good sign! As I exited the water, the swim clock said 17:00! Woo-hoo! My time was 18:00 in the earlier Triceratops. My official Pterodactyl time was 17:15, so in the first section of the race, I shaved off 0:45 seconds!

Then, I moved into transition. I had cut a significant amount of time off my T1 between my first triathlon of the season and the Triceratops tri, so I knew it was going to be tricky cutting time off in this section of the race. At the Triceratops triathlon, I was in T1 for 2:05. At the Pterodactyl triathlon, it was 2:15. Bummer! I lost 0:10 seconds there. Race on!
Onto the bike… I’d decided to ride my road bike instead of my time trial bike for this race. My time trial bike gave me some problems in my last training ride with the Hamburg Triathlon Team; I dropped it off at Hometown Bicycles, and went home and grabbed my road bike, so I could still get my workout in. I was shocked that I was 0.5 mph faster than I had ever been on my time trial bike. Decision made!

I pushed hard on my road bike during the race. Between not setting up my Garmin correctly and a non-functioning speedometer (I’d switched up wheels a number of times), I had to wait until after the race to find out that I had biked 3:16 faster at the Pterodactyl triathlon than I had at the Triceratops triathlon. Yeah, road bike! I had averaged 20.4mph in the Pterodactyl triathlon, 1.4mph faster than my 19.0mph average at the Triceratops triathlon. Overall, 3:51 faster by the end of the bike – now on to T2!

T2 was 1:50 at the Triceratops triathlon which I managed to beat at the Pterodactyl triathlon with a T2 of 1:45! 0:05 seconds saved! I’ll take it! Onto the run… this is a difficult section for me, as my hip and knee are not fond of running anymore. At the Triceratops triathlon, I ran the 5K in 29:39 at a 9:34 pace, which I was really happy with. At the Pterodactyl triathlon, I ran the 5K in 30:57, with a 9:59 pace, 1:18 slower.

I did set up my Garmin 920XT correctly for this section of the race – thank goodness! As I could see that my run was not going well, I decided to just focus on my overall time. I had finished the Triceratops in 1:30:49. I really wanted to finish in under 1:30 for the Pterodactyl triathlon, so I focused on the race clock and hammered my way down the hill. My final time was 1:28:44!! Yes! 2:05 faster!

At the Triceratops triathlon, I was 12th in my age group. At the Pterodactyl triathlon, with all my improvements, I was 9th in my age group! Success! Now, stay with me as I keep my training going and gear up for the final race of the T-Rex series, the T-Rex triathlon!

Amy is a 5 time Kona qualifier who has done 9 Ironman races, has been named All American by USAT 5 times, and is a Certified Ironman Coach.  She has done countless triathlons and won several of them, including sprint distance races and half Ironman races. Amy is currently conquering unique challenges on her journey back to IRONMAN following a life-altering accident.

AMY’S BLOG: 7/20/17

Amy Gluck's favorite Hoka running shoesWhile training for my October ½ marathon, I need to get in some long runs. So, on Friday, July 14 – a pleasant, sunny, cool-ish (70 degree) day – I decided it was time to re-attempt my 10 mile run, which had been rained out the day before. This run would also apply toward my Century Club miles.

Earlier, I had received a fabulous secret from one of my Ultra runner friends. (Ultra runners are people who run races longer than a marathon.) This is a great secret for anybody coming back from an injury, or trying to ramp up their mileage (or, in my case, both)! The secret is: run 0.75 miles and walk 0.25 miles. This is similar to the Galloway method, but the walking section doesn’t seem so long that it makes you a little crazy (like the Galloway method does for me)!

I went around Kensington on the paved path. My run was going really well. I had all my necessities – my Garmin 920XT, my Hoka’s, my washcloth, and my wristband. As I ran along, I kept an eye on my watch. Every time I felt like I needed to walk so I could breathe, I was about 0.1 miles away from my next walk break. At the end of my quarter mile walk, I felt like I was just about ready to start running again. This is unlike the Galloway method, where I was like….. “OMG! THAT much MORE walking!”

I finished my lap at Kensington, and was happy that the hill back up and into Island Lake was a walk section! As I got back to my car in Island Lake, I was at 9 miles. NO WAY was I going to quit that close to my target distance!! Therefore, I did what any reasonable person would do with a mission to run 10 miles – I ran the final mile in Island Lake, and since this was my last mile… NO WALKING! At the end of my run, I was thrilled to have completed 10 miles, and so happy that I had received this secret from my Ultra runner friend!

I averaged 12:35 for my pace – I will have to do better on race day. My ½ marathon PR is 1:26, which I did in a ½ Ironman in Kentucky. My goal for this year’s ½ marathon is to finish in less than 2:26. I should be able to drop down to an 11:14 pace before then. That’s just 1:10 to shave off my pace between now and October. It’s entirely possible, as I cut 1:00 off my 5K pace between the Island Lake Triathlon and the Triceratops Triathlon, about a month apart. Adjusting the 0.75/0.25 ratio on my running/walking intervals would probably make a significant difference, as long as I practice often, and make sure to save enough energy to cross the finish line at top speed!

Amy is a 5 time Kona qualifier who has done 9 Ironman races, has been named All American by USAT 5 times, and is a Certified Ironman Coach.  She has done countless triathlons and won several of them, including sprint distance races and half Ironman races. Amy is currently conquering unique challenges on her journey back to IRONMAN following a life-altering accident.

AMY’S BLOG: 7/15/17

Thunderstorm clipartSometimes inclement weather gets in the way of best laid training plans. My plan to run a full 10 miles on Wednesday was derailed by rain and thunderstorms. 10 miles would have put me well on my way for my ½ marathon training, and it would have really built up my confidence in my ability to get it done on this fake femur and knee.

I’d run 6.5 miles on 2 consecutive days, and was feeling strong about my chances of completing a 10-mile run. But before then, I decided to focus on biking, so my legs could recover before my next hard Altra-G treadmill workout. On a beautiful day – sunny and a cool 70 degrees – I biked 50 miles, thinking this would be a “run of the mill” workout. In my Ironman training, this would have been considered a “day off”. But now, it took more out of me than I had thought it would. A couple days later, my treadmill workout took out everything I had left. I’d planned to do a 10-mile run after, but my knee wasn’t feeling it, and neither was my energy level. So, the weather not cooperating probably saved me from putting myself into a state of overtraining!

As a triathlete, having my knee not feeling up to a running workout, I always have swimming to turn to. However, I had maxed out my energy level, and that stood in my way for getting in ANY kind of workout.

Looking ahead, I have a race coming up, the second T-Rex triathlon, on 7/19. Following that, I have the Jon Logan Memorial Triathlon on 7/30. Two races, one week apart, means I have no room for getting myself into an overtraining situation. My 10-mile run will have to wait a little longer.

I have also joined a group called the Century Club, which is a group of runners who report their daily miles and strive to attain 100 miles/month. By the 11th, I was at 28.71 miles, with no more attained since then. I can still make the 100 miles by the 31st, but I’ll have to get running soon, and will have to be careful not to push too hard.

Of course, using my Garmin 920XT to its maximum potential, I could measure how close I was to overtraining, but I’m trusting my gut feelings in the end. So, to keep my training at a manageable level, I followed a visit to Running Lab with a quick swim. I pushed it a little too hard in my “short” workout, swimming 800m in 15 minutes (which isn’t fast for me, but because I was tired, it felt like it was). To follow that up, I have a ride with the Hamburg Fitness Center Triathlon Club tonight. Shouldn’t be too bad – it’s just an hour workout. It’s hard to maintain a training level when I’m used to Ironman training……I have to get in the habit of monitoring my body’s current capabilities, instead of basing it off what I used to be able to do. It’s all about patience. Keep up with my blog to see how I do!

Amy is a 5 time Kona qualifier who has done 9 Ironman races, has been named All American by USAT 5 times, and is a Certified Ironman Coach.  She has done countless triathlons and won several of them, including sprint distance races and half Ironman races. Amy is currently conquering unique challenges on her journey back to IRONMAN following a life-altering accident.

AMY’S BLOG: 7/7/17

Hometown Bicycles' Amy Gluck crossing the finish line at Epic Races Island Lake Triceratops TriathlonTRICERATOPS TRIATHLON 2017: After naming this as my “A” race, I set several goals for the Triceratops Tri:

  1. To get out of T1 in less than 4 minutes
  2. To have a minimum of the same pace on my bike as my last race
  3. To run a 10:00 minute pace minimum

The weather for this race was ideal.  Leading up to it, we had several 90 degree days to warm up the water. Whew! I’d been fearful of needing a wetsuit, as it took me 5:25 minutes to get out of my wetsuit at the Island Lake triathlon!

The race was still wetsuit legal at 75.5 degrees. This meant others could enjoy the advantage of wearing a wetsuit, even if I didn’t. But I decided to go without and simply wear a swimskin, which is much easier to get out of.  Both this race and my last one had a ½ mile swim.  Overall, at the Island Lake Triathlon, where it took me forever to get out of my wetsuit in transition, my swim was 15:41 and my T1 was 5:25 for a total of 21:06 minutes.  At the Triceratops Triathlon, I wore my swimskin, had a slower swim, but much faster transition:  18:00 min swim, 2:05 T1 for a total of 20:05!  A total of a 1:01 time savings!   Yeah!  Goal #1 achieved!

Off to bike! …  I just wanted to average better than my bike pace at the Island Lake Triathlon, where I averaged 18.3 mph.  NOW, VERY IMPORTANT!  Learn my lesson, so you don’t wind up sacrificing your own race!  Make sure you get your bike checked over before your next event.  While I was riding, my chain fell off my large chain ring 5 times!  After the 4th time, I decided to just put it on the small chain ring to get going.  Was finally able to shift back to the large chain ring and finish out the ride without it falling off again.  At the Triceratops Triathlon, I averaged 19.0 mph on my bike.  YEAH!!  After hopping off my bike 5 times, I was still able to beat my average at the Island Lake Triathlon.  Goal #2 achieved!

On to the run! … I just wanted to average better than my Island Lake Triathlon pace, which was 10:43.  Anything sub 10:00 would have been great in my mind!  The run went well.  I waved to a few friends and got a few cheers along the way.  The run was fairly flat, once we got up the hill from the beach to the road.  I was pushing to go sub 1:30 total triathlon time.  Watching my pace on my Garmin, I knew I had a good chance of achieving my goal.  I pushed it hard at the end for a 9:34 average pace on the run!  WOO-HOO!!  All 3 goals achieved!

I finished in 1:30:49!  Not quite sub 1:30, like I thought was possible, as I was charging in on the finish line. Still, 5:02 seconds faster than the Island Lake Triathlon!  Stay with me as I tackle the Pterodactyl Triathlon – the next Sprint Triathlon in the T-Rex Series!

Amy is a 5 time Kona qualifier who has done 9 Ironman races, has been named All American by USAT 5 times, and is a Certified Ironman Coach.  She has done countless triathlons and won several of them, including sprint distance races and half Ironman races. Amy is currently conquering unique challenges on her journey back to IRONMAN following a life-altering accident.

AMY’S BLOG: 6/23/17

Hometown Bicycles' Amy Gluck at IRONMAN

Luckily, with the hot weather, I don’t think wetsuits will be legal at my next race – the T-Rex Triceratops Triathlon. This year, the T-Rex Series are my “A” races (basically, the peak races for my tri season). I’ve never had a Sprint Tri as my “A” race, since I started Ironman racing. In my mind, Sprints are too hard because they demand 100% speed all of the time, even through transition. Ironman made me too lazy to put 100% speed on all of the time. Ironman is more about proper pacing and avoiding 100% effort to save yourself for the end of the race.

I am guessing now that I will be wearing a swimskin for the Triceratops triathlon. That way, if the water is still cool, I’ll have some protection from that cold, and I will have my triathlon kit flattened down to my body, much like competitors wearing wetsuits (if they are allowed). The swimskins are not as restrictive to breathing as wetsuits, and they are much easier to get off. I won’t be stuck in my wetsuit at Transition-1 like I was at my first race. Six minutes is way too long to spend in T-1! My goal at this race is to be out of T-1 in under 4:00 minutes!

I’m looking forward to the Triceratops triathlon. I am hoping to swim well and get out of my swimwear quickly. I hope to just hold the bike section of my last race status quo. And I’m hoping I will be a lot faster on my run. The run course will be a little easier than at my last race. We will still go up the big hill in Island Lake that goes up from the beach to the road. Then we run up the path to Grand River and back down the path to the finish line. I’m hoping that the flatter run course will allow me to hold a pace better than my last run pace (10:43). This time, I’m shooting for a sub 10:00 min pace.

In addition, to make my running easier, I am also planning on wearing CEP tri shorts under my tri kit to keep my hip secured to my body while running. This is a crutch I’ve been using to help me run with all my new fake body parts, and muscles that have recently been cut through during my surgeries to put my leg back together.

Come on out and cheer on the Triceratops triathlon at Island Lake on Wednesday night at 6:00pm! I’m sure it will be a lot of people’s A race. Come on out and cheer them on putting 100% out there!

(Editor’s Note: Sorry folks, this race was yesterday, so you won’t be able to cheer Amy and her fellow triathletes on as requested. But you WILL be able to read about her race experience in her next blog. Stay tuned!)

Amy is a 5 time Kona qualifier who has done 9 Ironman races, has been named All American by USAT 5 times, and is a Certified Ironman Coach.  She has done countless triathlons and won several of them, including sprint distance races and half Ironman races. Amy is currently conquering unique challenges on her journey back to IRONMAN following a life-altering accident.

AMY’S BLOG: 6/15/17

Amy Gluck in wetsuit at a competition

I mentioned in my last blog that my swimming was the easiest thing to get back after my accident. However, I just found out that swimming does not feel the same.

With the weather getting into the 90’s this past week, the triathlon club FAST planned an open water swim in Trout Lake at Island Lake State Park. I haven’t been swimming much since the weather turned nice – though I’ve been able to get out on my bike – so, I felt it was a good idea for me to get a swim in. I pulled out my wetsuits and packed them up, ready to go.

At the park, I SQUEEZED into my wetsuit. They’d made me gain 40 lbs. in the hospital – I was 120 lbs. upon admission and they discharged me at 160 lbs. – but they did not offer to replace my wetsuit! With my wetsuit all zipped up, my lungs felt crushed. As I started swimming across the lake, my goggles fogged up and I had to stop and tread water to clear them out. By the time I figured out where I was going and put my face back in the water to swim, I was so out of breath after treading water and being suffocated in my wetsuit, that there was no way was I was going to swim back to the shore! What was I going to do? I was in the middle of the lake with no oxygen coming into my lungs.

I did the only reasonable thing anyone would do in my situation. I flipped over and started backstroking. One of the FAST members saw me and came to my rescue! Thanks Allen! He guided me to shore as I was backstroking my way in. As he was guiding me and I was backstroking, I reached back and unzipped my wetsuit. I thought it would feel a lot better than it actually did. Probably because the neck Velcro was still attached around my neck! Good times! (sarcasm) When he finally looked at me and said I could stand up now, I was so relieved!

As this first started happening, I had decided that I would swim the perimeter on the way home (along the shore). However, after making it in, I decided I was going to shed my wetsuit and walk back. Much safer! After crapping out on this section of my workout, I decided to get a good ride in. 25 miles later on the bike, I was ready to throw in the towel and give up my prime parking spot at Kent Lake Beach on an 88 degree day.

Looking back, I should have been swimming with a New Wave Swim Buoy, or swam the perimeter. Even though I had a wetsuit on, which helps support buoyancy, it wasn’t helping me to get back to shore…..always remember to flip to backstroke if you need to when swimming in open water, never swim alone, and keep some other type of flotation available to which you may resort!

Amy is a 5 time Kona qualifier who has done 9 Ironman races, has been named All American by USAT 5 times, and is a Certified Ironman Coach.  She has done countless triathlons and won several of them, including sprint distance races and half Ironman races. Amy is currently conquering unique challenges on her journey back to IRONMAN following a life-altering accident.

THE FIRST

If you’re looking for inspiration, you’ve found it! Hometown’s tri clinician, Amy Gluck, is tapping on her years of top-level IRONMAN training and competition, and the life-altering accident that put her passion to the test, to share something soul-stirring in the form of blogging about her recovery, her training triumphs and challenges, and her personal mission to get back to IRONMAN. Welcome to her first blog!

Hometown Bicycles' Amy Gluck at Island Lake TriathlonI’ve been training to get back into shape for the past few months, after taking 4 years off from doing absolutely nothing (while recovering from injuries caused by my accident). The easiest thing to get back was the swim. I was never a truly gifted swimmer, so that was not a big accomplishment, nor a big concern. Biking was the next to come back. Not quite as hard as running because I don’t have to support my weight, but still a challenging feat, especially compared to the shape I was in before. My running is still a work in progress. I’ve been using the Alter-G treadmill – which supports part of your weight through air pressure, and keeps you upright and running in a straight line – trying to find it possible to support my own weight on my fake hip, femur, and knee.

When I got in my accident, I had had the best pre-season training I could have possibly hoped for. I went with a coach to France and trained in the Pyrenees mountains for a week. The week after that, I had gone down to Atlanta to train with my coach, Laura Sophiea. Following that trip, I knew I was in much better shape than I had ever been in my life for Kona. Thinking back to this time, I am realizing that I never needed to ride on the day I was in the accident. Not only that, but I really didn’t feel like it that day either. I was dragging about getting started on my workout that day. I had decided that it was not acceptable to ride 100 miles at my usual – Island Lake State park. The thought of repeating laps out there was unbearable after having the advantage of training in the mountains for weeks that summer.

Not only did I not want to ride that day, but I did not need to either. Old habits die hard though. I had gotten in the position I was in by not skipping days of training, and couldn’t justify doing it on this particular day.

As my running has been the toughest thing to get back, I have just decided today to run the international half marathon in Detroit in October, pending my getting my passport. I believe using the Galloway method, it might be possible for me to finish this within a reasonable time. At this point, the longest I have been able to run is a 10K, which was a walk/run. I’ve been nervous to register for anything longer than a 5K since my accident because 5K’s alone seem so tough to me!

I did the Island Lake Triathlon on June 3rd, testing out my triathlon racing abilities. The same thing that I thought would hold me back did… my run! A 10:43 pace on a 5K does not lead to stellar finishes! I’ve been using the Alter-G treadmill with Ron Warhurst coaching me. This has been a great benefit for me to get back into running. He now recommends that I start running on my own, in addition to running these treadmill workouts I’ve doing 1x per week at ~5 miles at a time. With my future triathlon training and my ½ marathon training, I’ll be sure to put 100% effort into this next challenge! Stay with me and see how these things pan out………

Amy is a 5 time Kona qualifier who has done 9 Ironman races, has been named All American by USAT 5 times, and is a Certified Ironman Coach.  She has done countless triathlons and won several of them, including sprint distance races and half Ironman races. Amy is currently conquering unique challenges on her journey back to IRONMAN following a life-altering accident.
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